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DATE 2015-05-01

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MESSAGE
DATE 2015-05-02
FROM Ruben Safir
SUBJECT Subject: [NYLXS - HANGOUT] Semephores and what the heck are those things?
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http://www.makelinux.net/books/lkd2/ch09lev1sec4

*Linux kernel map in printable PDF* for $4 or €3


< open Table of Content

Team LiB

Previous Section
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Semaphores

Semaphores in Linux are sleeping locks. When a task attempts to acquire
a semaphore that is already held, the semaphore places the task onto a
wait queue and puts the task to sleep. The processor is then free to
execute other code. When the processes^[3]
holding the
semaphore release the lock, one of the tasks on the wait queue is
awakened so that it can then acquire the semaphore.

^[3] As you will see, multiple processes can simultaneously hold a
semaphore, if desired.

Let's jump back to the door and key analogy. When a person reaches the
door, he can grab the key and enter the room. The big difference lies in
what happens when another dude reaches the door and the key is not
available. In this case, instead of spinning, the fellow puts his name
on a list and takes a nap. When the person inside the room leaves, he
checks the list at the door. If anyone's name is on the list, he goes
over to the first name and gives him a playful jab in the chest, waking
him up and allowing him to enter the room. In this manner, the key
(read: semaphore) continues to ensure that there is only one person
(read: thread of execution) inside the room (read: critical region) at
one time. If the room is occupied, instead of spinning, the person puts
his name on a list (read: wait queue) and takes a nap (read: blocks on
the wait queue and goes to sleep), allowing the processor to go off and
execute other code. This provides better processor utilization than spin
locks because there is no time spent busy looping, but semaphores have
much greater overhead than spin locks. Life is always a trade-off.

You can draw some interesting conclusions from the sleeping behavior of
semaphores:

*

Because the contending tasks sleep while waiting for the lock to
become available, semaphores are well suited to locks that are held
for a long time.

*

Conversely, semaphores are not optimal for locks that are held for
very short periods because the overhead of sleeping, maintaining the
wait queue, and waking back up can easily outweigh the total lock
hold time.

*

Because a thread of execution sleeps on lock contention, semaphores
can be obtained only in process context because interrupt context is
not schedulable.

*

You can (although you may not want to) sleep while holding a
semaphore because you will not deadlock when another process
acquires the same semaphore. (It will just go to sleep and
eventually let you continue.)

*

You cannot hold a spin lock while you acquire a semaphore, because
you might have to sleep while waiting for the semaphore, and you
cannot sleep while holding a spin lock.

These facts highlight the uses of semaphores versus spin locks. In most
uses of semaphores, there is little choice as to what lock to use. If
your code needs to sleep, which is often the case when synchronizing
with user-space, semaphores are the sole solution. It is often easier,
if not necessary, to use semaphores because they allow you the
flexibility of sleeping. When you do have a choice, the decision between
semaphore and spin lock should be based on lock hold time. Ideally, all
your locks should be held as briefly as possible. With semaphores,
however, longer lock hold times are more acceptable. Additionally,
unlike spin locks, semaphores do not disable kernel preemption and,
consequently, code holding a semaphore can be preempted. This means
semaphores do not adversely affect scheduling latency.

A final useful feature of semaphores is that they can allow for an
arbitrary number of simultaneous lock holders. Whereas spin locks permit
at most one task to hold the lock at a time, the number of permissible
simultaneous holders of semaphores can be set at declaration time. This
value is called the usage count or simply the count. The most common
value is to allow, like spin locks, only one lock holder at a time. In
this case, the count is equal to one and the semaphore is called either
a binary semaphore (because it is either held by one task or not held at
all) or a mutex (because it enforces mutual exclusion). Alternatively,
the count can be initialized to a nonzero value greater than one. In
this case, the semaphore is called a counting semaphore, and it allows
at most count holders of the lock at a time. Counting semaphores are not
used to enforce mutual exclusion because they allow multiple threads of
execution in the critical region at once. Instead, they are used to
enforce limits in certain code. They are not used much in the kernel. If
you use a semaphore, you almost assuredly want to use a mutex (a
semaphore with a count of one).

Semaphores were formalized by Edsger Wybe Dijkstra^[4]
in 1968 as a
generalized locking mechanism. A semaphore supports two atomic
operations, P() and V(), named after the Dutch word Proberen, to test
(literally, to probe), and the Dutch word Verhogen, to increment. Later
systems called these methods down() and up(), respectively, and so does
Linux. The down() method is used to acquire a semaphore by decrementing
the count by one. If the new count is zero or greater, the lock is
acquired and the task can enter the critical region. If the count is
negative, the task is placed on a wait queue and the processor moves on
to something else. These names are used as verbs: You down a semaphore
to acquire it. The up() method is used to release a semaphore upon
completion of a critical region. This is called upping the semaphore.
The method increments the count value; if the semaphore's wait queue is
not empty, one of the waiting tasks is awakened and allowed to acquire
the semaphore.

^[4] Dr. Dijkstra (1930-2002) is one of the most accomplished
computer scientists in the (admittedly brief) history of computer
scientists. His numerous contributions include work in OS design,
algorithm theory, and the concept of semaphores. He was born in
Rotterdam, The Netherlands, and taught at the University of Texas
for 15 years. He is probably not happy with the large number of GOTO
statements in the Linux kernel, however.


Creating and Initializing Semaphores

The semaphore implementation is architecture dependent and defined in
. The struct semaphore type represents semaphores.
Statically declared semaphores are created via

static DECLARE_SEMAPHORE_GENERIC(name, count)


where name is the variable's name and count is the usage count of the
semaphore. As a shortcut to create the more common mutex, use

static DECLARE_MUTEX(name);


where, again, name is the variable name of the semaphore. More
frequently, semaphores are created dynamically, often as part of a
larger structure. In this case, to initialize a dynamically created
semaphore to which you have only an indirect pointer reference, use

sema_init(sem, count);


where sem is a pointer and count is the usage count of the semaphore.
Similarly, to initialize a dynamically created mutex, you can use

init_MUTEX(sem);


I do not know why the "mutex" in init_MUTEX() is capitilized or why the
"init" comes first here but second in sema_init(). I do know, however,
that it looks dumb and I apologize for the inconsistency. I hope,
however, that after you've read Chapter 7
, the kernel's
symbol naming does not shock anyone.


Using Semaphores

The function down_interruptible() attempts to acquire the given
semaphore. If it fails, it sleeps in the TASK_INTERRUPTIBLE state.
Recall from Chapter 3
that this process
state implies that a task can be awakened with a signal, which is
generally a good thing. If the task receives a signal while waiting for
the semaphore, it is awakened and down_interruptible() returns -EINTR.
Alternatively, the function down() places the task in the
TASK_UNINTERRUPTIBLE state if it sleeps. You most likely do not want
this because the process waiting for the semaphore does not respond to
signals. Therefore, use of down_interruptible() is much more common than
down(). Yes, again, the naming is not ideal.

You can use down_trylock() to try to acquire the given semaphore with
blocking. If the semaphore is already held, the function immediately
returns nonzero. Otherwise, it returns zero and you successfully hold
the lock.

To release a given semaphore, call up(). Consider an example:

/* define and declare a semaphore, named mr_sem, with a count of one */
static DECLARE_MUTEX(mr_sem);

/* attempt to acquire the semaphore ... */
if (down_interruptible(&mr_sem)) {
/* signal received, semaphore not acquired ... */
}

/* critical region ... */

/* release the given semaphore */
up(&mr_sem);


A complete listing of the semaphore methods is in Table 9.5
.


Table 9.5. Listing of Semaphore Methods

Method



Description

sema_init(struct semaphore *, int)



Initializes the dynamically created semaphore to the given count

init_MUTEX(struct semaphore *)



Initializes the dynamically created semaphore with a count of one

init_MUTEX_LOCKED(struct semaphore *)



Initializes the dynamically created semaphore with a count of zero (so
it is initially locked)

down_interruptible(struct semaphore *)



Tries to acquire the given semaphore and enter interruptible sleep if it
is contended

down(struct semaphore *)



Tries to acquire the given semaphore and enter uninterruptible sleep if
it is contended

down_trylock(struct semaphore *)



Tries to acquire the given semaphore and immediately return nonzero if
it is contended

up(struct semaphore *)



Releases the given semaphore and wakes a waiting task, if any


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