Fri May 29 08:13:18 2020
EVENTS
 FREE
SOFTWARE
INSTITUTE

POLITICS
JOBS
MEMBERS'
CORNER

MAILING
LIST

NYLXS Mailing Lists and Archives
NYLXS Members have a lot to say and share but we don't keep many secrets. Join the Hangout Mailing List and say your peice.

DATE 2015-03-01

LEARN

2020-05-29 | 2020-04-29 | 2020-03-29 | 2020-02-29 | 2020-01-29 | 2019-12-29 | 2019-11-29 | 2019-10-29 | 2019-09-29 | 2019-08-29 | 2019-07-29 | 2019-06-29 | 2019-05-29 | 2019-04-29 | 2019-03-29 | 2019-02-28 | 2019-01-28 | 2018-12-28 | 2018-11-28 | 2018-10-28 | 2018-09-28 | 2018-08-28 | 2018-07-28 | 2018-06-28 | 2018-05-28 | 2018-04-28 | 2018-03-28 | 2018-02-28 | 2018-01-28 | 2017-12-28 | 2017-11-28 | 2017-10-28 | 2017-09-28 | 2017-08-28 | 2017-07-28 | 2017-06-28 | 2017-05-28 | 2017-04-28 | 2017-03-28 | 2017-02-28 | 2017-01-28 | 2016-12-28 | 2016-11-28 | 2016-10-28 | 2016-09-28 | 2016-08-28 | 2016-07-28 | 2016-06-28 | 2016-05-28 | 2016-04-28 | 2016-03-28 | 2016-02-28 | 2016-01-28 | 2015-12-28 | 2015-11-28 | 2015-10-28 | 2015-09-28 | 2015-08-28 | 2015-07-28 | 2015-06-28 | 2015-05-28 | 2015-04-28 | 2015-03-28 | 2015-02-28 | 2015-01-28 | 2014-12-28 | 2014-11-28 | 2014-10-28

Key: id Value: 543039

Key: archive_learn Value: 2015-03-01

MESSAGE
DATE 2015-03-16
FROM mrbrklyn@panix.com
SUBJECT Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Operating Systems Chapter 3 HW complete
From owner-learn-outgoing-at-mrbrklyn.com Mon Mar 16 15:18:20 2015
Return-Path:
X-Original-To: archive-at-mrbrklyn.com
Delivered-To: archive-at-mrbrklyn.com
Received: by mrbrklyn.com (Postfix)
id 389D91612E7; Mon, 16 Mar 2015 15:18:20 -0400 (EDT)
Delivered-To: learn-outgoing-at-mrbrklyn.com
Received: by mrbrklyn.com (Postfix, from userid 28)
id 25FDB1612EB; Mon, 16 Mar 2015 15:18:20 -0400 (EDT)
Delivered-To: learn-at-nylxs.com
Received: by mrbrklyn.com (Postfix, from userid 1000)
id B0C9A1612E9; Mon, 16 Mar 2015 15:18:19 -0400 (EDT)
Date: Mon, 16 Mar 2015 15:18:19 -0400
From: mrbrklyn-at-panix.com
To: learn-at-nylxs.com
Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Operating Systems Chapter 3 HW complete
Message-ID: <20150316191819.GA31735-at-www.mrbrklyn.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/mixed; boundary="17pEHd4RhPHOinZp"
Content-Disposition: inline
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit
User-Agent: Mutt/1.5.21 (2010-09-15)
Sender: owner-learn-at-mrbrklyn.com
Precedence: bulk
Reply-To: learn-at-mrbrklyn.com


--17pEHd4RhPHOinZp
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Disposition: inline

This is all of the chapter 3 question and one programming project.

I wanted to do more of the programming projects but I've been busy
working on a virtual server and testing custom kernel compiles for
our scheduler project, which I wanted just finish and get off my
plate. The Kernel is so large now and difficult to set up the
config file that is takes more time. It doesn't help to have
hostile developers now who think users aren't supposed to ask
about kernel internals. This makes me fustrated. When did it
happen that asking to compile a kernel is offensive to distribution
developers and that development tools became exclussive property
of the few??

Umbuntu, and the Umbuntu attitude really is crushing the Linux community.

Ruben

--
So many immigrant groups have swept through our town
that Brooklyn, like Atlantis, reaches mythological
proportions in the mind of the world - RI Safir 1998
http://www.mrbrklyn.com

DRM is THEFT - We are the STAKEHOLDERS - RI Safir 2002
http://www.nylxs.com - Leadership Development in Free Software
http://www2.mrbrklyn.com/resources - Unpublished Archive
http://www.coinhangout.com - coins!
http://www.brooklyn-living.com

Being so tracked is for FARM ANIMALS and and extermination camps,
but incompatible with living as a free human being. -RI Safir 2013


--17pEHd4RhPHOinZp
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="hw_os_cpt3.txt"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit


Practice Exercises
3.1
Using the program shown in Figure 3.30, explain what the output will
be at LINE A.

Answer: A is 5

#include
#include
#include
int value = 5;

int main()
{
pid t pid;
pid = fork();
if (pid == 0) { /* child process */
value += 15;
return 0;
}
else if (pid > 0) { /* parent process */
wait(NULL);
printf("PARENT: value = %d",value); /* LINE A */
return 0;
}
}


3.2
Including the initial parent process, how many processes are created by
the program shown in Figure 3.31?

Answer:
Eight!!!

xterm???bash???a.out???a.out???a.out???a.out
? ? ??a.out
? ??a.out???a.out
? ??a.out



#include#include

int main()
{
/* fork a child process */
fork();
/* fork another child process */
fork();
/* and fork another */
fork();
return 0;
}
Figure 3.31 How many processes are created?


3.3
Original versions of Apple’s mobile iOS operating system provided no
means of concurrent processing. Discuss three major complications that
concurrent processing adds to an operating system.

Answer: memory requiements are larger with + multisourced oses,
longer wait times for i/o an ready cues since there
is a limited schedular without concurency, but the application that is
running reacts faster since there is no CPU overhead for short term scheduling.

Few registers are needed on the CPU for quick concurancy contact swaps.


3.4
The Sun UltraSPARC processor has multiple register sets. Describe what
happens when a context switch occurs if the new context is already
loaded into one of the register sets.

Answer: On the hardware level, registers are just switched, and the
program counter just reset, rather than the entire context tossed on the stack.

What happens if the new context is
in memory rather than in a register set and all the register sets are in
use?

All the context has to be rebuilt off the stack a, and all the active
registers have to be reset to the saved condition.


3.5
When a process creates a new process using the fork() operation, which
of the following states is shared between the parent process and the child
process?
a. Stack
b. Heap
c. Shared memory segments

Answer: Share Memory segments.

3.6
Consider the “exactly once”semantic with respect to the RPC mechanism.
Does the algorithm for implementing this semantic execute correctly
even if the ACK message sent back to the client is lost due to a network
problem? Describe the sequence of messages, and discuss whether
“exactly once” is still preserved.

If a client demanding a RPC doesn't retreive the ACK under the exactly once
semantic, then it will time out and send another request to the server. Each
request as a time stamp, and when the server sees the duplicate, it will not
open another request, but send a new ack instead.


3.7
Assume that a distributed system is susceptible to server failure. What
mechanisms would be required to guarantee the “exactly once” semantic
for execution of RPCs?

What is he fishing for here? This was just explained.

3.8
Describe the differences among short-term, medium-term, and long-
term scheduling.

Short term Scheduling is the rotation of all processes on the ready cue
to get cpu time.

Long Term scheduling is used to balance types of process usage and to
keep resources management from running away.

medium-term scheduling will roll processes tepmorarily off of the ready
cue when cpu time is tied up, and load processes onto swap.


#include#include

int{
main()
int i;
Exercises
for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
fork();
return 0;
}
Figure 3.32 How many processes are created?


3.9 Describe the actions taken by a kernel to context-switch between
processes.

When a context switch occurs, the kernel saves the context
of the old process in its PCB and loads the saved context of the new process
scheduled to run. Virtual address space might need to be saved as well


3.10 Construct a process tree similar to Figure 3.8. To obtain process infor-
mation for the UNIX or Linux system, use the command ps -ael.


[ruben-at-stat13 ~]$ pstree -Ap
init(1)-+-NetworkManager(2364)-+-dhclient(2509)
| |-{NetworkManager}(2365)
| |-{gdbus}(2377)
| `-{gmain}(2376)
|-acpid(2273)
|-agetty(2849)
|-agetty(2850)
|-agetty(2851)
|-agetty(2852)
|-agetty(2853)
|-agetty(2854)
|-at-spi-bus-laun(5511)-+-dbus-daemon(5515)
| |-{dconf worker}(5512)
| |-{gdbus}(5514)
| `-{gmain}(5516)
|-at-spi2-registr(5518)---{gdbus}(5520)
|-avahi-daemon(2610)---avahi-daemon(2611)
|-colord(2728)-+-{gdbus}(2730)
| `-{gmain}(2731)
|-console-kit-dae(2335)-+-{gdbus}(2360)
| |-{gmain}(2358)
| |-{vt_thread_start}(2355)
| `-{writer_thread_s}(2340)
|-crond(2588)
|-cupsd(2726)---{cupsd}(2734)
|-dbus-daemon(2314)
|-dbus-daemon(2986)
|-dbus-launch(2985)
|-dconf-service(5562)-+-{gdbus}(5564)
| `-{gmain}(5565)
|-gvfs-udisks2-vo(5420)-+-{gdbus}(5421)
| `-{gmain}(5422)
|-gvfsd(3013)---{gdbus}(3014)
|-gvfsd-cdda(5430)---{gdbus}(5431)
|-gvfsd-fuse(3017)-+-{gdbus}(3027)
| |-{gvfs-fuse-sub}(3028)
| |-{gvfsd-fuse}(3025)
| `-{gvfsd-fuse}(3026)
|-gvfsd-metadata(5537)---{gdbus}(5539)
|-gvim(3802)---{gdbus}(3803)
|-kactivitymanage(3139)-+-{QInotifyFileSys}(3146)
| |-{QThread}(3143)
| |-{QThread}(3144)
| |-{QThread}(3145)
| |-{QThread}(3147)
| `-{QThread}(5390)
|-kded4(3041)---{QInotifyFileSys}(3275)
|-kdeinit4(3037)---klauncher(3039)
|-knotify4(3271)---{QInotifyFileSys}(3272)
|-kuiserver(3701)
|-lxdm-binary(2544)-+-Xorg.bin(2587)---{Xorg.bin}(2732)
| `-lxdm-session(2882)---wmaker(2889)---wmaker(2988)-+-oclock(2992)
| |-xterm(2993)---bash(3004)---pstree(5869)
| |-xterm(2994)---bash(3003)
| |-xterm(3790)---bash(3792)
| |-xterm(4911)---bash(4913)---okular(5616)-+-{QI+
| | `-{QP+
| `-xterm(5394)---bash(5396)
|-metalog(2224)---metalog(2225)
|-ntpd(2781)
|-oclock(3000)
|-pidgin(2999)---{gdbus}(3011)
|-polkitd(2362)-+-{gdbus}(2378)
| |-{gmain}(2363)
| |-{polkitd}(2379)
| `-{runaway-killer-}(2380)
|-rsyslogd(2248)-+-{in:imklog}(2250)
| |-{in:imuxsock}(2249)
| `-{rs:main Q:Reg}(2251)
|-sshd(2804)
|-udevd(699)
|-udisksd(3093)-+-{cleanup}(3111)
| |-{gdbus}(3109)
| |-{gmain}(3107)
| `-{probing-thread}(3110)
|-upowerd(3048)-+-{gdbus}(3050)
| `-{gmain}(3049)
`-wicd(2408)---wicd-monitor(2478)



Use the command man ps to get more information about the ps com-
mand. The task manager on Windows systems does not provide the
parent process ID, but the process monitor tool, available from tech-
net.microsoft.com, provides a process-tree tool.


3.11 Explain the role of the init process on UNIX and Linux systems in regard
to process termination.

init is the system program that launches all the services that control the GNU/Linux
system. It is the root process and waits for all the child processes. Ultimately
it cleans zombie processes.

Its roll has been dramatically expanded and changed with the advent of
systemd, and no longer are the processes just spun off and waited for. Instead,
many core functions have been built directly into the init binary.

The initiation system for Linux has evolved over the years from a BSD proc system
to what was then called SySV and now we have systemd, or the competing openrc.
Emphasis on fail over and remote usage has pushed comercial vendors to a more
integrated approch in systemd at process 1.

3.12 Including the initial parent process, how many processes are created by
the program shown in Figure 3.32?

#include
#include
int main() {
int i;
for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
fork();
return 0;
}

Figure 3.32


This is the same as before and creates 8 processes

P -> P2 -----> P3 -> P4
| |
P3 ->P4 P4
|
P4


3.13 Explain the circumstances under which which the line of code marked
printf("LINE J") in Figure 3.33 will be reached.


ANSWER: NONE

man execlp
The exec() family of functions replaces the current process image with
a new process image. The functions described in this manual page are
front-ends for execve(2). (See the manual page for execve(2) for fur?
ther details about the replacement of the current process image.)




#include
#include
#include
int main()
{
pid t pid;
/* fork a child process */
pid = fork();

if (pid < 0) { /* error occurred */
fprintf(stderr, "Fork Failed");
return 1;
}
else if (pid == 0) { /* child process */
execlp("/bin/ls","ls",NULL);
printf("LINE J");
}
else { /* parent process */
/* parent will wait for the child to complete */
wait(NULL);
printf("Child Complete");
}
}

3.14 Using the program in Figure 3.34, identify the values of pid at lines A, B,
C, and D. (Assume that the actual pids of the parent and child are 2600
and 2603, respectively.)

#include
#include
#include

int main()
{
pid_t pid, pid1;
/* fork a child process */
pid = fork();
if (pid < 0) { /* error occurred */
fprintf(stderr, "Fork Failed");
return 1;
}
else if (pid == 0) { /* child process */
pid1 = getpid();
printf("child: pid = %d",pid); /* A */
printf("child: pid1 = %d",pid1); /* B */
}
else { /* parent process */
pid1 = getpid();
printf("parent: pid = %d",pid); /* C */
printf("parent: pid1 = %d",pid1); /* D */
wait(NULL);
}
return 0;
}

A = 0
B = 2603
C = 2603
D = 2600



Figure 3.34 What are the pid values?
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
#include
#include
#include
#define SIZE 5
int nums[SIZE] = {0,1,2,3,4};
int main()
{
int i;
pid t pid;
Exercises
pid = fork();
if (pid == 0) {
for (i = 0; i < SIZE; i++) {
nums[i] *= -i;
printf("CHILD: %d ",nums[i]); /* LINE X */
}
}
else if (pid > 0) {
wait(NULL);
for (i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
printf("PARENT: %d ",nums[i]); /* LINE Y */
}
}
return 0;
Figure 3.35

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
3.15 Give an example of a situation in which ordinary pipes are more suitable
than named pipes and an example of a situation in which named pipes
are more suitable than ordinary pipes.

One a services that has multiple child processes to talk to then ordinary pipes
are more useful. And example might be the Apache Web Server where multiple
children are spun off the parent and communication with the parent.

However, a named pipe is needed for any communication between two seperate
processes. It you need a music stream, for example, you be sent through a
service, you will need a named pipe for the streamer to talk to and the server
will have to read from the pipe.




3.16 Consider the RPC mechanism. Describe the undesirable consequences
that could arise from not enforcing either the “at most once” or “exactly
once” semantic. Describe possible uses for a mechanism that has neither
of these guarantees.

If timestamps are not compared and at most once of exactly once semantics are
not used then clients can not be assured that the data stream is correct
if they don't recieve a return message. The system is then fully dependent
of the physical perfection of the intrastructure for communication assurance.



3.17 Using the program shown in Figure 3.35, explain what the output will
be at lines X and Y.


Parent 0,1,2,3,4
Child 0,-1,-2,-3,-4




3.18 What are the benefits and the disadvantages of each of the following?
Consider both the system level and the programmer level.
a. Synchronous and asynchronous communication
Synchronous communications are slower and will cause latency problem but guantanty
communications with lower overhead as more communication is blocked until sending
matches recieving.


b. Automatic and explicit buffering
The text doesn't explain explicit buffering, but automatic buffering has
the advantage of having bound or infinite buffering space which allows
for lower message latency and few or no sender blocks.

I think the textbook maybe is messed up in this spot and needs rediting.

I would thing explicit buffering is any finetely defined buffering on the
communications que, which is GOOD and SECURE even though it requires sender blocks

INFINITE would be automatic and that is opimistic and NOT secure.


c. Send by copy and send by reference
Send by copy is a problem with MACH kernels because several copies of information is made.
It is essential for distributed systems but for smaller systems that share memory references
can lower the system overhead.

d. Fixed-sized and variable-sized messages
Fixed sized messages give certainty of buffer
needs and sizes and variable messages allow for greater
optimizations





Programming Problems
3.19 Using either a UNIX or a Linux system, write a C program that forks
a child process that ultimately becomes a zombie process. This zombie
process must remain in the system for at least 10 seconds. Process states
can be obtained from the command
ps -l

#include
#include
#include
#include
#include


int main( int argc, char * argv[]){
pid_t pid;
int i = 0;
puts("\nBefore the While Loop");
while( i++ < 100){
puts("\nBefore the Fork in the Loop:");
printf( "Loop ==> %d \n", i);
pid = fork();
puts("\nFork: This should print twice for every loop:");

if(pid < 0){
puts( "fork failed\n" );
return 1;
}
if(pid == 0) {
puts("\n\nChildren of the world unite");
printf("Am Yisrael Chai! pid =>%d \n", pid);
printf( "Loop in Child ==> %d \n", i);
puts("BYE!!");
exit( EXIT_SUCCESS );
}
if (pid > 0 ){
printf("In the Parent => I'm waiting %d\n", pid );
printf( "Loop in Parent ==> %d \n", i);
//wait(NULL);
puts("Done Waiting for Child");
}
}
return 0;
}

18456 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out
18457 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out
18458 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out
18459 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out
18460 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out
18461 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out
18462 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out
18463 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out
18464 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out
18465 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out
18466 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out
18467 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out
18468 ruben 20 0 0.0m 0.0m 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 Z `- a.out

~~~~~~~~~~~~

--17pEHd4RhPHOinZp--

  1. 2015-03-01 Ruben <ruben.safir-at-my.liu.edu> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Fwd: Re: Linked List Test Question
  2. 2015-03-02 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] [ruben-at-mrbrklyn.com: fork problem]
  3. 2015-03-03 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Re: fork problem
  4. 2015-03-04 Maneesh Kongara <maneeshkongara-at-gmail.com> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] Mid term in Allorithms
  5. 2015-03-04 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] Mid term in Allorithms
  6. 2015-03-04 Maneesh Kongara <maneeshkongara-at-gmail.com> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] Mid term in Allorithms
  7. 2015-03-04 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] Mid term in Allorithms
  8. 2015-03-04 Ruben Safir <ruben.safir-at-my.liu.edu> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] Mid term in Allorithms
  9. 2015-03-04 Maneesh Kongara <maneeshkongara-at-gmail.com> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] Mid term in Allorithms
  10. 2015-03-04 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Kanpsack problemi
  11. 2015-03-04 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Mid term in Allorithms
  12. 2015-03-05 Kamran <kamran.mirzayev-at-my.liu.edu> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] Canonical's 2015 OpenStack Roadshow
  13. 2015-03-05 mrbrklyn-at-panix.com Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Canonical's 2015 OpenStack Roadshow
  14. 2015-03-05 Ruben <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Forks - Operating systems class
  15. 2015-03-06 Ruben <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] KDE Mentoring -
  16. 2015-03-06 Ruben <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] networking class
  17. 2015-03-07 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Operating Systems class submition
  18. 2015-03-08 From: "keisha.sylvester" <keisha.sylvester-at-my.liu.edu> RE: [LIU Comp Sci] Operating Systems Supplement Text
  19. 2015-03-08 Ruben <ruben.safir-at-my.liu.edu> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] Operating Systems Supplement Text
  20. 2015-03-08 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Operating systems HW
  21. 2015-03-08 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Operating Systems Supplement Text
  22. 2015-03-08 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Re: Operating systems HW
  23. 2015-03-11 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] Operating Systems class submition
  24. 2015-03-11 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] February Journal almost completed
  25. 2015-03-16 mrbrklyn-at-panix.com Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Operating Systems Chapter 3 HW complete
  26. 2015-03-16 mrbrklyn-at-panix.com Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] [ruben-at-mrbrklyn.com: os hw]
  27. 2015-03-17 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Fwd: NYC local: UNIGROUP 19-MAR-2015 (Thu): Penguin Computing presents
  28. 2015-03-19 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] LIU Center for Entrepreneurship + Innovation
  29. 2015-03-20 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Optimum
  30. 2015-03-20 mrbrklyn-at-panix.com Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] [jkeen-at-verizon.net: 2nd New York City Perl Hackathon: hold the
  31. 2015-03-22 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Re: Kernel thread scheduling
  32. 2015-03-22 mrbrklyn-at-panix.com Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] [jkeen-at-verizon.net: New York City Perl Hackathon 2015: Registration
  33. 2015-03-22 mrbrklyn-at-panix.com Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] [vinc94-at-gmail.com: Re: Kernel thread scheduling]
  34. 2015-03-22 mrbrklyn-at-panix.com Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] [xerofoify-at-gmail.com: Re: Kernel thread scheduling]
  35. 2015-03-23 Keisha Sylvester <keisha.sylvester-at-my.liu.edu> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] Meeting Announcement II
  36. 2015-03-23 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Meeting Announcement II
  37. 2015-03-23 mrbrklyn-at-panix.com Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] [gabor-at-szabgab.com: [Perlweekly] #191 - Hackathon after Hackathon]
  38. 2015-03-24 Maneesh Kongara <maneeshkongara-at-gmail.com> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] GNU/Linux 1
  39. 2015-03-24 Maneesh Kongara <maneeshkongara-at-gmail.com> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] GNU/Linux 1
  40. 2015-03-24 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] GNU/Linux 1
  41. 2015-03-25 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] GNU/Linux 1
  42. 2015-03-25 Ruben <ruben.safir-at-my.liu.edu> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] GNU/Linux 1
  43. 2015-03-25 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Re: [LIU Comp Sci] GNU/Linux 1
  44. 2015-03-25 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] decent threading outline that fills in where our notes let off
  45. 2015-03-25 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] I love this HW problem
  46. 2015-03-25 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Java Crimes
  47. 2015-03-25 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] jobs jobs
  48. 2015-03-25 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Threaded Programming example
  49. 2015-03-25 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Threads and Speed
  50. 2015-03-26 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Cpt 4 HW from pr 13-18
  51. 2015-03-26 Ruben <ruben.safir-at-my.liu.edu> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Fwd: [NYLXS - HANGOUT] GNU/Linux 1
  52. 2015-03-26 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Kernel Learning Resource - #1
  53. 2015-03-27 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] AVl Trees
  54. 2015-03-27 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Re: Cpt 4 HW Programming Project 4-20 (and 3-20)
  55. 2015-03-28 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Jobs
  56. 2015-03-28 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] JOUNAL MEETING AT 10AM TOMORROW
  57. 2015-03-29 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] Fwd: usage of dma_common_mmap
  58. 2015-03-30 Ruben Safir <mrbrklyn-at-panix.com> Subject: [LIU Comp Sci] HW 4.18 Problem

NYLXS are Do'ers and the first step of Doing is Joining! Join NYLXS and make a difference in your community today!